Avatar as Alternative for Java Server Faces (JSF) and JavaFX? – JavaOne 2012

Posted in Java / JEE, Web Framework on October 2nd, 2012 by Kai Wähner

Project Avatar was announced at JavaOne 2011. After no further information until JavaOne 2012, some new information was announced at this year’s conference. Even a little demo was shown in the keynote. Contrary to JavaFX, Avatar offers the realization of modern web applications without requiring a browser plugin. Web applications are realized with HTML5 and JavaScript (Nashorn implementation) on client-side, and Java EE backend on server-side. Avatar is also suitable for creating mobile applications (smartphone, tablet), because it does not depend on a browser plugin.

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When to use JavaFX 2 instead of HTML5 for a Rich Internet Application (RIA)?

Posted in Java / JEE, Web Framework on April 18th, 2012 by Kai Wähner

These days, we are starting a new project for realizing a Rich Internet Application (RIA). One of the first questions is: Which technologies and frameworks shall we use? The backend will be Java or another modern JVM language, as we are mainly experienced Java developer. In most use cases, we also prefer web frameworks, which allow to code mostly in Java, as many of us just have basic knowledge regarding HTML and JavaScript.

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Book Review: Pro JavaFX 2 – A Definitive Guide to Rich Clients with Java Technology

Posted in Web Framework on April 18th, 2012 by Kai Wähner

The book gives an introduction to JavaFX 2, a web framework for realizing Rich Internet Applications (RIA). Overall, this is good book. If you want to get started with JavaFX 2, then you should buy this book. The book is easy to read and has good code examples (which you can download, too) for every feature.

 

Publication Date: February 29, 2012

ISBN-10: 1430268727

ISBN-13: 978-1430268727

Edition: 1

Authors: Jim Weaver, Weiqi Gao, Stephen Chin, Dean Iverson, and Johan Vos

Publisher: Apress

 

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Pros and Cons – When to use a Portal and Portlets instead of just Java Web-Frameworks

Posted in Application Server, Java / JEE, Web Framework on October 7th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

I had to answer the following question: Shall we use a Portal and if yes, should it be Liferay Portal or Oracle Portal? Or shall we use just one or more Java web frameworks? This article shows my result. I had to look especially at Liferay and Oracle products, nevertheless the result can be used for other products, too. The short answer: A Portal makes sense only in a few use cases, in the majority of cases you should not use one. In my case, we will not use one.

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When to use Spring Roo?

Posted in Application Server, Cloud, Java / JEE, Web Framework on April 5th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

In this article, I will tell you about my experiences with Spring Roo. I will give recommendations when to use Spring Roo and when not to use it (yet).

What is Spring Roo?

“Spring Roo is a lightweight developer tool that makes it fast and easy to deliver instant results. Best of all, you code 100% in Java and get to reuse all your existing Java knowledge, skills and experience. You’ll like it – and have plenty of fun too!” (http://www.springsource.org/roo)
Many introductory articles exist already, just use Google if you do not know Spring Roo yet. In a nutshell: Spring Roo is a Java-based tool (using the SpringSource Tool Suite which is based on Eclipse). It uses AspectJ to simulate many features of Grails and other frameworks with dynamic languages to improve the developer experience.

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Categorization and Comparison of popular Web-Frameworks in the Java / JVM Environment

Posted in Java / JEE, Web Framework on December 30th, 2010 by Kai Wähner

Categorization of Web-Frameworks in the Java Environment

The following article shows a categorization of Java / JVM web-frameworks, considering different types of web applications. The intention is to give an overview, not to start a flame war.

Motivation

An uncountable number of web-frameworks exists in the Java environment. If you visit IT conferences or google for comparisons, almost always you find a discussion about the advantages and disadvantages. Often, a flame war is the consequence, each guy likes or dislikes a specific framework. Thus, a neutral comparison, which helps to choose the one which fits best for your requirements, is rare.

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Lessons learned: SmartGWT 2.3 – Component-Library for Google Web Toolkit (GWT)

Posted in Java / JEE, Web Framework on December 11th, 2010 by Kai Wähner

I used SmartGWT 2.3 in our last project (duration: 6 months). I wanna share my experiences with that component library in the following.

IMPORTANT: All information is my personal opinion! We bought the SmartGWT Power license, but we used SmartGWT without commercial training or commercial support. Regard this, when you read my stated CONs!

What is SmartGWT?

SmartGWT (http://code.google.com/p/smartgwt) is a component library for the Google Web Toolkit (GWT). Four different licences exists. The visual components are free (LGPL). Three further licences exists (see http://www.smartclient.com/product). These licences offer several additional features and components such as data binding, a “push”-implementation or Hibernate integration. We chose the Power Edition. SmartGWT is maintained by SmartClient (http://www.smartclient.com/smartgwt). SmartClient also offers commercial support.

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