Apache Camel and Talend ESB: Management and Monitoring of Integration Routes and SOAP / REST Web Services (JMX, OSGi, logstash, ElasticSearch, Kibana, hawtio)

Posted in ESB on July 15th, 2013 by Kai Wähner

A question every customer asks me: How can you manage and monitor integration routes implemented with Apache Camel (http://camel.apache.org/) and / or Talend ESB (http://en.talend.com/products/esb) (which is based on Apache Camel and also available as open source version). This blog post will show different alternatives to answer this question. The good news first: As Apache Camel and Talend ESB are based on open standards, you can use your own frameworks and tools if tooling of the product is not sufficient. So, I will not talk just about features of Apache Camel or Talend ESB, but also about additional options. Except for Talend Administration Center (user interface on top of Talend ESB’s service monitoring and clustering features), all tools are open source. Talend Administration Center is only available in Talend’s enterprise editions.

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Enterprise-ready Tool Support for Apache Camel

Posted in EAI, ESB, Java / JEE on November 23rd, 2012 by Kai Wähner

Apache Camel is my favorite integration framework on the Java platform due to great DSLs, a huge community, and so many different components. Camel is used by many developers from different companies all over the world. However, most guys are not aware that some really cool and – more important – enterprise-ready tooling is available for Camel, too. Many people ask me about Camel tooling when I do talks at conferences. This is the reason for this short blog post about Camel tooling.

[FYI: I work for Talend (one of the vendors). Please also read the comments from my Red Hat friends at the bottom!]

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Apache Camel Tutorial – Introduction to EIP, Routes, Components, Testing, and other Concepts

Posted in EAI, ESB, Java / JEE on May 4th, 2012 by Kai Wähner

Data exchanges between companies increase a lot. The number of applications, which must be integrated increases, too. The interfaces use different technologies, protocols and data formats. Nevertheless, the integration of these applications shall be modeled in a standardized way, realized efficiently and supported by automatic tests. Such a standard exists with the Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIP) [1], which have become the industry standard for describing, documenting and implementing integration problems. Apache Camel [2] implements the EIPs and offers a standardized, internal domain-specific language (DSL) [3] to integrate applications. This article gives an introduction to Apache Camel including several code examples.

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Spoilt for Choice: Which Integration Framework to use – Spring Integration, Mule ESB or Apache Camel?

Posted in EAI, ESB, Java / JEE on January 10th, 2012 by Kai Wähner

Data exchanges between companies increase a lot. The number of applications which must be integrated increases, too. The interfaces use different technologies, protocols and data formats. Nevertheless, the integration of these applications shall be modeled in a standardized way, realized efficiently and supported by automatic tests.

Three integration frameworks are available in the JVM environment, which fulfil these requirements: Spring Integration, Mule ESB and Apache Camel. They implement the well-known Enteprise Integration Patterns (EIP, http://www.eaipatterns.com) and therefore offer a standardized, domain-specific language to integrate applications.

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Cloud Integration with Apache Camel and Amazon Web Services (AWS): S3, SQS and SNS

Posted in Cloud, EAI, ESB, Java / JEE on August 30th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

The integration framework Apache Camel already supports several important cloud services (see my overview article at http://www.kai-waehner.de/blog/2011/07/09/cloud-computing-heterogeneity-will-require-cloud-integration-apache-camel-is-already-prepared for more details). This article describes the combination of Apache Camel and the Amazon Web Services (AWS) interfaces of Simple Storage Service (S3), Simple Queue Service (SQS) and Simple Notification Service (SNS). Thus, The concept of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is used to access messaging systems and data storage without any need for configuration.

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Apache Camel and Scala: A Powerful Combination

Posted in EAI, Java / JEE on June 23rd, 2011 by Kai Wähner

I really like the integration framework Apache Camel and I also like Scala a lot. This article shows the basics of this combination. It is NO introduction to Apache Camel or Scala. I created a Git project to use it as simple startup for Camel-Scala-Maven projects using just the basic Camel concepts and only a few complex Scala features (i.e. very „Java-friendly“).

Problems when Starting with this Combination

I had several problems finding good resources for starting when I first tried to combine them. I have a lot of Camel experience, but only basic Scala knowledge. I tried to start with some projects which where already available in the web (e.g. from the „Camel in Action“ book or other Git examples).

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When to use Apache Camel?

Posted in Application Server, EAI, ESB, Java / JEE, SOA on June 2nd, 2011 by Kai Wähner

Apache Camel is one of my favorite open source frameworks in the JVM / Java environment. It enables easy integration of different applications which use several protocols and technologies. This article shows when to use Apache Camel and when to use other alternatives.

The Problem: Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)

Enterprise application integration is necessary in almost every company due to new products and applications. Integrating these applications creates several problems. New paradigms come up every decade, for example client / server communication, Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) or Cloud Computing.

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