What is the TCO difference between IBM WebSphere and Open Source JBoss? – Just my two cents…

Posted in Application Server, BPM, Cloud, EAI, ESB, Java / JEE, SOA on December 19th, 2012 by Kai Wähner

Disclaimer: I work for an “open source company”. The following is my personal opinion!

Great Article: “What is the TCO difference between WebSphere and JBoss?”

I have spotted a really great article about comparing prices of open source and proprietary products: “What is the TCO difference between WebSphere and JBoss?“. The interesting aspect is, that this article is written by an IBM-biased company (Prolifics). Usually, only open source vendors write such comparisons. I really like this article, seriously! It is good to see comparisons not only by open source vendors, but also by vendors such as IBM (in this case, Prolifics cannot be considered unbiased, it is an IBM consulting company – but that is fine). I just want to give my two cents to this article in the following…

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Why I will use Java EE (JEE, and not J2EE) instead of Spring in new Enterprise Java Projects in 2012

Posted in Application Server, Java / JEE on November 21st, 2011 by Kai Wähner

The question comes up often. It came up in my new project in November 2011, too. I will use Java EE (JEE) instead of the Spring framework in this new Enterprise Java project.

I know: Several articles, blogs and forum discussions are available regarding this topic. Why is there a need for one more? Because many blogs talk about older versions of Java EE or because they are not neutral (I hope to be neutral). And because many people still think thank EJBs are heavy! And because the time has changed: It is Java EE 6 time now, J2EE is dead. Finally! Finally, because not only JEE 6 is available, but also several application servers (not just Glassfish as reference implementation). I do not want to start a flame war (too many exist already), I just want to describe my personal opinion of the JEE vs. Spring „fight“…

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Pros and Cons – When to use a Portal and Portlets instead of just Java Web-Frameworks

Posted in Application Server, Java / JEE, Web Framework on October 7th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

I had to answer the following question: Shall we use a Portal and if yes, should it be Liferay Portal or Oracle Portal? Or shall we use just one or more Java web frameworks? This article shows my result. I had to look especially at Liferay and Oracle products, nevertheless the result can be used for other products, too. The short answer: A Portal makes sense only in a few use cases, in the majority of cases you should not use one. In my case, we will not use one.

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Rapid Cloud Development with Spring Roo – Part 2: VMware Cloud Foundry

Posted in Application Server, Cloud, Java / JEE on August 12th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

Spring Roo is a tool to offer rapid application development on the Java platform. I already explained when to use it: http://www.kai-waehner.de/blog/2011/04/05/when-to-use-spring-roo.  Spring Roo supports two solutions for Cloud Computing at the moment: Google App Engine (GAE) and VMware Cloud Foundry. Both provide the Platform as a Service (PaaS) concept. This article will discuss the Cloud Foundry support of Spring Roo. GAE was discussed in part 1 of this article series (http://www.kai-waehner.de/blog/2011/07/18/rapid-cloud-development-with-spring-roo-%E2%80%93-part-1-google-app-engine-gae).

Deployment of a Cloud Foundry Application to the Cloud

The reference guide of Spring Roo gives an introduction at http://www.springsource.org/roo/guide?w=base-cloud-foundry, which describes the combination of Spring Roo and Cloud Foundry. In a nutshell, there is not much to do to deploy your (CRUD-) application in the Cloud Foundry cloud.

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Cloud Computing Heterogeneity will require Cloud Integration – Apache Camel is already prepared!

Posted in Application Server, Cloud, ESB, Java / JEE, SOA on July 9th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

Cloud Computing is the future – if you believe market forecasts from companies such as Gartner. I think so, too. But everybody should be aware that there won’t be one single cloud solution, but several clouds. These clouds will be hosted at different providers, use products and APIs from different vendors and use different concepts (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS). Thus, in the future you will have to integrate these clouds as you integrate applications today.

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When to use Apache Camel?

Posted in Application Server, EAI, ESB, Java / JEE, SOA on June 2nd, 2011 by Kai Wähner

Apache Camel is one of my favorite open source frameworks in the JVM / Java environment. It enables easy integration of different applications which use several protocols and technologies. This article shows when to use Apache Camel and when to use other alternatives.

The Problem: Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)

Enterprise application integration is necessary in almost every company due to new products and applications. Integrating these applications creates several problems. New paradigms come up every decade, for example client / server communication, Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) or Cloud Computing.

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When to use Spring Roo?

Posted in Application Server, Cloud, Java / JEE, Web Framework on April 5th, 2011 by Kai Wähner

In this article, I will tell you about my experiences with Spring Roo. I will give recommendations when to use Spring Roo and when not to use it (yet).

What is Spring Roo?

“Spring Roo is a lightweight developer tool that makes it fast and easy to deliver instant results. Best of all, you code 100% in Java and get to reuse all your existing Java knowledge, skills and experience. You’ll like it – and have plenty of fun too!” (http://www.springsource.org/roo)
Many introductory articles exist already, just use Google if you do not know Spring Roo yet. In a nutshell: Spring Roo is a Java-based tool (using the SpringSource Tool Suite which is based on Eclipse). It uses AspectJ to simulate many features of Grails and other frameworks with dynamic languages to improve the developer experience.

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10 interesting Statements of Adam Bien about the Java Enterprise Edition 6 (JEE 6)

Posted in Application Server, ESB, Java / JEE on September 10th, 2010 by Kai Wähner

Yesterday, I visited the one-day conference “DOAG SIG Java”, because I presented about applicability and limits of Java Server Faces 2.0 (JSF 2.0). The main subject was the Java Enterprise Edition 6 (JEE 6). I wrote a report about it in another blog entry: One-Day Conference “DOAG SIG Java 2010” about Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) 6.

The final track included a live demo of Adam Bien, a well-known JEE expert, author and speaker (also involved in the JEE specs). A very nice “live show” of the JEE 6 features!
The participants (including me) asked a lot of questions crititcally, Adam Bien always had very good answers and explanations because of his excessive experiences with Java technologies for several years.

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Report: One-Day Conference “DOAG SIG Java 2010” about Java Enterprise Edition 6 (JEE 6)

Posted in Application Server, ESB, IT Conferences, Java / JEE on September 9th, 2010 by Kai Wähner

Today, I visited the one-day conference “DOAG SIG Java”. The main subject was the Java Enterprise Edition 6 (JEE 6).

I presented about applicability and limits of Java Server Faces 2.0 (JSF 2.0). You can download my (german) presentation slides:  DOAG SIG Java (Sept2010) – Einsatz und und Grenzen von Java Server Faces 2.0

“DOAG SIG Java” – What’s that?

The DOAG is a very large, german, independent Oracle-Usergroup. After the acqisition of Sun, the SIG Java was established to demarcate the Java technology from other business units (database, administration, …). Conferences are organized several times a year, the number of participants varies from 50 to 2000.

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JEE Development using JRebel with IBM WebSphere (WAS) 6.1 and RAD 7.0

Posted in Application Server, Java / JEE on August 14th, 2010 by Kai Wähner

JEE Development using JRebel with IBM WebSphere (WAS) 6.1 and RAD 7.0

I want to share my experiences with JRebel (http://www.zeroturnaround.com/jrebel/). If you need some neutral information about this product to ease development with J2EE / JEE applications and application servers, this blog entry is for you!

Problems with JEE Application Servers

If you develop with WAS, no matter if it is version 5 / 6 / 6.1 / 7, deployment takes a very long time. Even changing a single line of code (e.g. to add a System.out.println) takes about 15 minutes in our project for publishing the changes, because you always have to do a build and redeployment. So, sometimes you have to wait 50 percent of your working time until WebSphere is ready again.

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